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Student athlete heads to World University Games thanks to alumni scholarship
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Student athlete heads to World University Games thanks to alumni scholarship

written by Richard Allen | 14 August 2017
Current MA Sport Business student, Daniel Gardiner, is heading to the World University Games this month after being awarded the first Carnegie School of Sport Scholarship.

Thanks to the kind generosity of Carnegie School of Sport alumni, Daniel Gardiner will be representing Great Britain and Leeds Beckett at the World University Games. The World University Games or Universiade is the largest multi-sport event behind the Olympics, and this year takes place in Taipei where Daniel will compete in the long jump.

Daniel’s opportunity to take part in the Games has been made possible by alumni from the class of 1957 to more recent graduates, who attended our Inaugural Carnegie School of Sport reunion lunch earlier this year and chose to support the new scholarship fund to support current students.

Daniel said “It’s a great honour to be selected to represent Great Britain in such a prestigious event. Opportunities like this makes all the hard work and sacrifice worth it. Without this support I would have had to fund part of the trip myself which would mean working more hours and neglecting my training. It has allowed me to dedicate 100 per cent of my focus and time into doing the best I can. I would like to say thank you for the generous support they have given. It will be an honour to represent Great Britain but also an honour to represent the alumni who have made this possible.”

There is only so much time in the day that you can train, so having something else can be refreshing and can actually help you become more disciplined and focused. The school are very understanding of student-athletes and give you all the support you could possibly need.
In this day and age most Olympic athletes go into further education. Sport is short lived so you have to have a back-up for when you retire. Education for an athlete should be as important as a non-athlete in my eyes

Daniel balances his athletic career alongside his studies for an MA in Sport Business, after completing his undergraduate degree in Sport and Exercise Science in 2013 at Leeds Beckett. Daniel sees his education in the Carnegie School of Sport as being just as important as his sport, and offers him the support and skills that he needs to be able to compete at the top level and broaden his career opportunities.

“There is only so much time in the day that you can train, so having something else can be refreshing and can actually help you become more disciplined and focused. The school are very understanding of student-athletes and give you all the support you could possibly need. In this day and age most Olympic athletes go into further education. Sport is short lived so you have to have a back-up for when you retire. Education for an athlete should be as important as a non-athlete in my eyes” said Daniel.

Vic Ambler (Physical Education, 1957) attended the reunion in June and commented “I am really pleased that Daniel has been selected for the World University Games and that we have been able to help him. My involvement as coach of World University Games Basketball between 1973 (Russia) and 1995 (Japan) was the highlight of my career. Daniel will gain so much at the competition and he has a sensible approach to the balance of education and sport, he will represent Carnegie with pride and achievement. Competing abroad is not the same – it is more challenging, in addition to finding out that they do things differently! They say foreign travel broadens the mind – I hope so and that he finds the jumping distances gets him a medal – for Carnegie!”

Dean of Carnegie School of Sport, and alumnus himself, Peter Mackreth (pictured right with Daniel) was delighted by the support for the new scholarship saying “I am immensely proud of the tradition of the Carnegie School of Sport, and the generosity of our former students who want to extend opportunities to the next generation. I hope that our Carnegie alumni will take pride in Daniel as he represents them, and the University, at the Games and that this is only the first of many awards to support our students.”

When Daniel, who hopes that the Games will beat his previous top sporting memory of competing in front of 40,000 people at the Anniversary Games at the Olympic Stadium, flies out to Taipei he will have the support of our alumni community in more ways than one – and we’ll make sure we keep you updated on Daniel’s success and experiences.